Premier Chess At The “2019 Vesuvio Chess Festival”

It was during Evan’s trip to Italy that Premier Chess’ Facebook page hit 7600 likes. He shared a lot of his experience throughout the country through Premier Chess’ social media, that’s why you should all follow us here! He’s played in the strongest section of the tournament. Indeed his two losses were against International Masters, one of which was definitely not one sided. Anyway we want you to witness one of the game that took place during the 2019 Vesuvio Chess Festival.

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[Event “Vesuvio Chess Festival”]
[Site “Boscorecase, Italy”]
[Date “Nov 30, 2019”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Rabin, Evan “]
[Black “Mansugo”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]

1. e4 Nc6 2. d4 {Black’s 1st move Nc6 allows a certain flexibility. In this
position both d5 and e5 have been played a lot.} 2… d6

(2… Nf6?! {Here White
can play e5 and get back into the Alekhine, but d5 should give him a solid
advantage!} 3. d5 Ne5 4. f4 Ng6 5. e5 Ng8) 3. d5 Nb8 4. c4 e6 5. Nc3 exd5 6.
cxd5 Nf6 7. Nf3 {[%csl Yd6,Yd5,Ye4,Rf8,Rc7][%cal Rf3e5,Rb5c6,Gc6e5]If we compare this position to a Benoni-type position there are
certain similarities and difference we should notice. White has a central e4-d5
pawn chain. But Black’c pawn is still on c7 unlike in the Benoni where he is on
c5. Moreover Black hasn’t played the move g6-g7.} 7… Be7 8. Bd3 O-O 9. h3 c6
{I think c6 makes a lot of sense since c5 would make the queenside appear like a
benoni while still having Black’s dark-squared bishop sitting on e7, which
wouldn’t help out Black’s diabolical plan on the Queenside. The h8-a1 diagonal
is a thing.} 10. O-O cxd5 11. exd5 h6 12. Bf4 Re8 13. Rc1 a6 14. Bb1 Nbd7 15.
Re1 Bf8 16. Rxe8 {Perhaps keeping more pieces on the board would be interesting
since Black’s position seems to be somewhat cramped.} 16… Qxe8 17. Qd4
{Centralizing your pieces is almost always a good thing.} 17… b5 18. Nd1 {The
opening part is definitely over and an original game occurred.} 18… Bb7 19.
Ne3 Rc8 20. Re1 Qd8 21. g4 Qb6 22. Qd2 Qc5 23. Rd1 Nb6 24. Nf5 Qxd5 25. Qxd5
Bxd5 26. N3d4 Nc4 27. b3 Ne5 28. Ne3 Bb7 29. Ndf5 Ne4 30. Bxe4 Bxe4 31. Nxd6
Nf3+ 32. Kf1 Bxd6 33. Bxd6 Kh7 34. Bf4 Rc6 35. Nd5 Rc2 36. Nb4 Rb2 37. Nxa6 Rxa2
38. Nc5 Bc6 39. Rd6 Ra1+ 40. Ke2 Re1+ 41. Kd3 Be8 42. Rb6 Rh1 43. Ke4 Rxh3 44.
Kd5 Rh1 45. Rb8 Rd1+ 46. Ke4 Bc6+ 47. Ke3 Rc1 48. Nd3 Rg1? 49. Rb6 Bd5 50. Rxb5
Bc6 51. Rc5 Ba8 52. Rc8 Bd5 53. Bg3 Ng5 54. Nc5 Rb1 55. Rb8 Re1+ 56. Kd4 Bf3 57.
Bf4 Ne6+ 58. Nxe6 Rxe6 59. Be5 f6 60. Bc7 Bxg4 61. b4 Bf3 62. b5 h5 63. Rd8 h4
64. b6 h3 65. Kc5 Re5+ 66. Bxe5 fxe5 67. Rd3 h2 68. Rxf3? h1=Q 69. Rb3? Qh4 70.
b7 Qd4+? 71. Kb5 Qd7+ 72. Kc5? Qe7+? (72… Qc7+ {This would have allowed Black
to secure the win.}) 73. Kc4 Qf7+ 74. Kc3 Qc7+ 75. Kd3 Qb8 76. Ke4 Kg6 77. Rb6+
Kf7 78. Kd5 Ke7 79. Kc6 Qe8+ 80. Kc5 Qb8 81. Kc6 Qd6+ 82. Kb5 {Now this is a
dead draw. White made somewhat of a fortress.} 82… Qb8 83. Kc6 1/2-1/2

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Evan Rabin at the Vesuvio Open
(NM) Evan Rabin playing chess in Italy

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