Chess Movie and Documentary Recommendations

By Candidate Master Danilo Cuellar, Premier Chess Rockland County Instructor and Founder of  Danilovich Chess 

Here’s the list of my recommended chess related documentaries and movies.

These films are free on Amazon Prime: 

 Magnus

This film is called “Magnus”. It came out in 2016. It’s a documentary style film about the life of child prodigy, Magnus Carlsen. He became world champion in 2013 when he was 23 years old. He’s still world champion today. I saw it a few years ago and it inspired me to get back into chess in a major way. It’s a gorgeous documentary. It’s free to watch on Amazon Prime as of now.

See the trailer here.

Endgame 

Since he was 5 yrs. old, Jose’s Abuelita taught him to play chess like his grandfather who was a champion in Mexico. Now as part of the Brownsville school team, Jose has the chance to use his skills and for once in his life, finds himself in the spotlight, as he tries to help his team make it to the Texas state finals. As their coach, Mr. Alvarado, teaches his students the meaning of perseverance and team effort in the face of adversity, Jose discovers his own strengths and uses them to bring his broken family together.

See the trailer here.

These films are currently free on YouTube:

Life of a King

Life of a King is the unlikely true story of Eugene Brown and his one-man mission to give inner-city kids of Washington D.C. something he never had – a future. He discovered a multitude of life lessons through the game of chess during his 18-year incarceration for bank robbery. After his release and reentry into the workforce, Eugene developed and founded the Big Chair Chess Club to get kids off the streets and working towards lives they never believed they were capable of due to circumstances. From his daring introductory chess lessons to group of unruly high school students in detention to the development of the Club and the teens’ first local chess competitions, this movie reveals his difficult, inspirational journey and how he changed the lives of a group of teens with no endgame.

See the trailer here.

Knights of the South Bronx

The movie is based on the true story of David MacEnulty who taught schoolchildren of the Bronx Community Elementary School 70 to play at competition level, eventually winning New York City and the New York State Chess Championships. The screenplay portrays whistle-blowing and a mid-life crisis that combine to remove Richard Mason (played by Ted Danson) from his old life. He becomes a substitute teacher and is assigned to a fourth-grade class in a South Bronx school. In the class are students with parents who are drug addicts or in jail or just scrambling to pay the bills. Few of them see a purpose in school other than meeting society’s requirements, and he struggles, mostly in vain, to reach them.

Then a student whose father is in jail sees Mason in the park playing a simultaneous exhibition, and beating fourteen opponents at once. He asks to learn the game. One thing leads to another, and soon the entire class is interested in the game. Mason convinces them that on the chessboard it doesn’t matter how much money you have or what clothes you’re wearing or where you come from, and that it’s only the moves you make, then and there. The class forms a team to compete in ever-larger tournaments.

See the trailer here.

These films are great, but are not free on Netflix, Amazon Prime, or YouTube.

Searching for Bobby Fischer

Josh Waitzkin and his family discover that he possesses a gift for chess and they seek to nurture it. They hire a strict instructor, Bruce Pandolfini, who aims to teach the boy to be as aggressive as chess legend Bobby Fischer. The title of the film is a metaphor about the character’s quest to adopt the ideal of Fischer and his determination to win at all costs. Josh is also heavily influenced by Vinnie, a speed chess hustler whom he meets in Washington Square Park. The two coaches differ greatly in their approaches to chess, and Pandolfini is upset that Josh continues to adopt the methods of Vinnie. The main conflict in the film arises when Josh refuses to accept Pandolfini’s misanthropic frame of reference. Josh then goes on to win on his own terms.

See the trailer here.

Queen of Katwe

Living in the slum of Katwe in Kampala, Uganda, is a constant struggle for 10-year-old Phiona Mutesi (Madina Nalwanga) and her family. Her world changes one day when she meets Robert Katende (David Oyelowo), a missionary who teaches children how to play chess. Phiona becomes fascinated with the game and soon becomes a top player under Katende’s guidance. Her success in local competitions and tournaments opens the door to a bright future and a golden chance to escape from a life of poverty.

See the trailer here.

Pawn Sacrifice

This is a 2014 American biographical drama film about chess player Bobby Fischer. It follows Fischer’s challenge against top Soviet chess grandmasters during the Cold War and culminating in the World Chess Championship 1972 match versus Boris Spassky in Reykjavík, Iceland.

See the trailer here.

Brooklyn Castle

Brooklyn Castle is the remarkable and improbable true story of I.S. 318 in Brooklyn. The school, where 65% of students live below the federal poverty level, has the highest ranked junior high chess team in the nation. The heart of the film is the engaging young students who populate the team: Rochelle, who has the goal of becoming the first female African-American chess master; Pobo, the team’s charismatic leader; Justus, an entering student who must manage the high expectations that come with achieving master status at an early age; Alexis, who feels the pressure of his immigrant parents’ desire for him to realize the American dream; Patrick, who uses chess to help overcome his ADHD; and James, the young rapping maestro and budding chess talent; among several others. We have the honor of having some IS 318 alumni in our fall virtual classes

See the trailer here.

For some reviews on recent chess films, check out WIM Alexey Root, PhD‘s recent SparkChess article.

What is your favorite chess film?

Lessons from Jodi Samuel’s Chutzpah, Wisdom and Wine

by CEO National Master Evan Rabin 

On or off the chess board, every move must have a purpose. In September 2016, I travelled with Masa Israel to the IAC Conference in Washington DC. At the gala dinner, my friend Garrison Corben and I had trouble deciding on a table to sit at and randomly chose one that seemed to have an interesting mix of people. At the very least, I thought it was random; it turns out Hashem had other plans. Once we started introducing ourselves to the others at the table and mentioned to Alisa Adler that I recently moved back to New York, she said she would love to help me and that I had to meet her good friend Steve Eisenberg. A few minutes later Steve came by the table to say hello to Alisa and said he would take care of me moving forward. A few days later, he set me up with Shabbat plans and meals for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. I also began joining his weekly Torah classes and other Jewish International Connections in New York (JICNY) events. In 2017, I had the honor of participating in Steve’s Israel Recharge trip, which Alisa co-led. Since then, I’ve also become good friends with Steve’s co-founders of JICNY, Jodi and Gavin Samuels. Through Jodi’s recent book Chutzpah, Wisdom and Wine, which was one of the major topics of our recent podcast, episode, I learned several key lessons including, one needs to always focus on the positives of every situation, the world is narrow bridge and that we all need to give back to our communities. 

Jodi has explored the world and has seen probably more than anyone I know. She grew up in South Africa, where she experienced being held up in gun point, lived under rocket attacks in Israel and has traveled to almost hundred countries and has seen some of the most bizarre situations. One fun fact about her life that was shocking to me, is despite the fact that she raised three kids, not once has she changed a diaper. I have a hard time believing that! It take’s someone like Jodi and her chutzpah to get a stranger on the plane to change her baby’s diaper.

On a more serious note, Jodi has had the challenge of raising her youngest child, her daughter Caila, who was born with Down syndrome. When she was born, several people felt bad for the family and she and Gavin thought quite the opposite. Jodi explains how they thought if they could open up their home for anyone, frequently having Shabbat meals for 40+ people, it would be impossible for them to not accept their own daughter. 

I have personally never seen a person with Down syndrome or autism be angry. While Caila and the family have had lots of challenges, they were inspirational, never letting Down syndrome stop Caila from succeeding in life. Jodi and Gavin fought tooth and nails for her to be accepted to mainstream schools in New York and Israel. She has developed friends and a strong sense of humor. For instance, one day Jodi sent her to her friend for Shabbat lunch. Caila overheard that Jodi’s friend suggested they carry a change of clothes just in case she had an accident and Jodi insisted that it wasn’t necessary. Shortly after, Caila scared the host by joking that she had an accident, when everything was clear.

Until today, Jodi always has struggled about whether or not Israel is the place for her. Yesterday, Jodi shared on Facebook how her elder daughter Temira got her papers to enroll in the army, what Jodi describes as the one piece of mail that comes in on time in Israel. She wrote, “I keep getting reminded I do live in Israel, in spite of all my protests!” On one hand Jodi has struggled living in Israel, having to deal with people shouting, lots of bureaucracy, nosiness, security concerns, etc. Furthermore, Israel did not provide nearly as many resources for Caila: “In order to match what Caila was getting- for free- in New York’s education system, we spent thousands of extra dollars a month to get tutors and therapies to get her the support she needs to be in a typical school environment” (194). 

It is Jodi’s chutzpah, shameless audacity, that has kept her to stay in Israel. Her kids and husband Gavin have adapted to Israel well. Inspired by the third weekly torah portion when God commands Abraham to leave his native homeland, Jodi’s “life motto is Lech Lecha. Go. Or just do it. And that we did, with no wavering. When I decide to do something, it’s all or nothing.” While we can all have challenges, it’s important to be persistent and always attempt to finish what we started.

When I studied for a semester at Tel Aviv University in 2011, I definitely missed home at times and experienced some of the items Jodi did on a small scale. I once lost my debit card and it took several weeks to get a replacement one from New York. Thankfully, my friends helped out and lent me some money short-term and I got by but it was definitely a little nerve wracking, being in a foreign country without any access to cash. While some day Jodi Struggles, “love is the overriding reason that compels [her] to stay… Seeing how [her] children are thriving, watching Gavin draw from the Idealism of this life, [she] is [in Israel] because of love” (267). While a chess player may be annoyed by a mistake or a loss, he needs to learn from that and maintain focus for his next move. My grandfather Jack Rabin’s first cousin Fay made Aliyah to Israel from the US. 40 years ago and her whole family followed, thanks to the Law of Return, which allows all Jews to gain Israeli citizenship without questions. While Israel has its challenges, it is astonishing to be able to go to sites of our ancestors like the Western Wall and the burial sites of our matriarchs and patriarchs in Hebron. 

If there is one thing that COVID-19 has taught us, it is how one person can create such a big impact on the world, either positively or negatively. One person consuming a bat in Wuhan, China essentially influenced the entire world to be in lockdown. However, while connectedness in this regard has been venomous, it can also be a blessing. While many of us have been Zoom fatigued, we should be grateful that this time has been an opportunity to stay connected with people around the world. For instance, I recorded my podcast episode with Jodi, while I was in New York and she was in Jerusalem. 

I have been to 24 countries and each one, I have met people through chess, Jewish and music communities. Learn more about my travel in this US Chess article. Jodi has travelled the world extensively and has hosted 10,000 members from 40 countries to JICNY events and her own Shabbat dinners. While people have come from different backgrounds, they have all got along as Jodi writes, “ Many of our deepest lifelong friendships began at our Shabbat table, stretching to our days in outback New York Zealand all the way to New YOrk. We can be very proud of the 126 married couples  as of this writing whose relationships began at one of our JIC events, the first of which were a Beligan and a Hungarian Jew who met in New York. This dear couple and their children now live in Israel and they were regulars with us for many Shabbats a year. Stories like this make the risks of hosting the masses worth it. (248). I am an active JICNY participant and perhaps will be added on to this list of 126 couples, god willing! 

The chess world is also a narrow bridge, as I have friends throughout the world from chess. When I played in the 2019 Vesuvio International, I met a guy who played a tournament in Las Vegas. It turns out his first round opponent Brian Solomon is a good friend from Boston, both from the chess and Jewish communities. 

Jodi also teaches the importance of tikkun olam, giving back and making the world a better place, as exhibited by the great success of JICNY. Unlike many other non-profits, JICNY does not have any high-paid non-profit executives on staff. At the same time, the organization  keeps busy with “two-hundred plus events.. annually with only one paid employee who works twenty hours a week”(250). In addition, the Samuels family has been involved with Shabbat of a Lifetime, “an organization that matches non-Jewish tourists  with Israeli families for a traditional Shabbat dinner…  It is a real-life example of how our connection with thousands of years of a rich and beautiful heritage enable Israel and the Jewish people to survive, even thrive “(251). Unfortunately anti-semitism and ideological warfare still exsists today; one of the best ways for us to fight both is leading be example. Rabbi Levi Welton and Rachel Farjado have taught me the importance of teaching the 7 Noahide laws, which apply to all non-Jews.

In order to build a community and prevent hate, as discussed in this podcast episode with Rabbi Levi Welton and Reverend Gregory Livingston, we need to truly live as one and teach others about our communities. For instance, non-observant Jews and gentiles alike see Shabbat as restrictive; they do not realize it is quite the opposite as observant Jews are the only ones who are not glued to their phones and restricted to technology on Shabbat and holidays.

Likewise, education can stop misconceptions about chess players. For instance, there is a rising population of women playing the game and it is not as much of a nice industry as most people think it is. When I go to networking events, people are often shocked when I state Premier Chess is one of many chess companies in New York. 

Outside of community events, Jodi and Gavin has done a lot of work as Down syndrome advocates. She has developed and maintained the Facebook page Caily’s World and writing the Metroimma blog. As marketers teach “AIDA”, awareness is essential, as it is that which leads to interest, which leads to desire, which leads to action. With that in mind, Jodi and Gavin have also spoken at many events and provided mentorship to other families with Down syndrome.

As we learn in life, it is imperative that we give back to others. Chess has been my passion since I was 7 and I made master when I was 20. While I enjoyed the first few years of my career in enterprise sales, selling technology solutions to financial institutions, retailers and state, local and education institutions for Oracle and Rapid7, I couldn’t be happier to have returned to my true passion, managing chess programs, where we teach business and life lessons to students of all ages and skill levels. Give your self a favor today and buy a copy of Chutzpah, Wisdom and Wine today so you can be motivated to make the best out of every situation, build communities and give back, utilizing your true passion

Chess and Acting

by Dylan Kaplan,  NYU Tisch School of the Arts Alumnni 
When I act, I must envision exactly what I want prior to beginning my scene. During the scene, I use tactics with the other actors onstage to achieve my desired goal or outcome. The same is true in chess. Chess requires the player to look moves ahead using complex strategies to outwit the other opponent. Life is a chess match but so is acting. That’s why both chess and acting date so far back in our history. Use “The world is a stage” quote from Shakespeare.

Chess the Musicalcenters around the tensions between the US and Soviet Union during the world Chess championship. In the original production, the stage was designed as a chess board. The characters in the play act as chess pieces with the two main chess players serving as each country’s “king”. Through a number of different strategies, each country tries to disrupt the other country’s king player. This show is just one example of how anytime actors are onstage they are chess pieces in the grand scheme of the game. The game is the production taking place on stage.

In a deeper context, there is a hierarchy to any sort of live entertainment production. There is always a director or “king” who spearheads the musical. The stage manager is interlinked with the entire creative team and serves as the production’s “queen” figure. The rest of the creative team functions as other leading figures to the show. The spectacle of the show is created by these different team members. They can be symbolized as the knight, bishop, or rooks of a production. In the end, the actors serve as pawns which is why they begin and usually end the show. In chess, the first move of the game starts a new story. It is the result of choices made by the players that determine the way the story will end. Theatre works the same way.
Seen by Dylan Kaplan at Wednesday 9:55pm

Sports and Chess Edition – Continued

By Eliana Bane, Marketing Intern

“These young guys are playing checkers. I’m out there playing chess​.” ~K​obe Bryant

Many sports players acknowledge the skill, strategy and technique that is needed to play chess. Kobe Bryant is known as one of the best players that played in the NBA. He appeared in 15 All-Star Games, won four All-Star Game MVP Awards, and two NBA Finals MVP Awards. Bryant achieved greatness. His basketball skills were spectacular and he dominated the court. Kobe Bryant parallels basketball to chess. He says, “…I’m out there playing chess”, showing that he feels he is one step ahead of his opponents. While Kobe Bryant was not a chess player, his mindset was in line with a chess game, staying ahead of your opponent and recognizing their next move.

The second athlete of this week’s Sports and Chess edition is Shaun Alexander. He is a former running back for the Seattle Seahawks and Washington Redskins. In 2005, Alexander became the first Seahawk to win the MVP award. Along with Alexander’s football skills, he is an avid chess player. He started playing chess in junior high and in around 2005 was named to the board of America’s Foundation for Chess. Shaun Alexander donated thousands of dollars to develop a chess program for students to encourage them to stay in school and to get educated.

One day after the Hawks first Super Bowl win, Alexander went to Madrona Elementary School in Seattle to give out prizes for the winners of the chess tournament that was created by America’s Foundation for Chess. He also raffled a trip, all-expenses paid, to Hawaii, to watch him play in his 3rd Pro Bowl. Shaun Alexander says, “ ‘Chess teaches them to think ahead three or four moves. It teaches them to have a vision. They learn to say to themselves, ‘If I make this move, this will happen.’ Those are things kids don’t get on their own.’”.

A Brief History of Chess

By Shai Hecker, Operations Intern

Chess is one of the oldest games that is still around today. Although no one knows the exact location where the game came from there seems to be a consensus that the game originated in India around the 8th century. However, Persia helped shape the game as well. When you take a look at the chess board you’ll notice that each piece is a character. The Islamic world was vast, but they rejected gambling/gaming. However, when they learned of the game of chess they began playing it.

This was during what the historians call the Islamic Golden Age which began around the time of the creation of chess. During this time the Islamic Empires stretched out into Africa, Asia, and Europe. This allowed for the game of chess to spread quickly in the three continents.

By the 9th century the game came to Russia from Northern Europe. The game quickly spread across the country and people happily adopted the new past time. What was great about chess was that it could be played by anyone in any class. This allowed for the game to really grow during these times and spread throughout the world. In 2019 Russia had schools teach students chess instead of having a third period of physical education.

During the later middle ages the game became very popular in Europe, but it was not until 1851 that the first international tournament was organized.  In 1886 Wilhelm Steinitz, an Austrian-American, became the first world chess champion.

Since then the game has rapidly evolved. In 1924 a few years after the first World War France took initiative and established FIDE, The Federation Internationale des Echecs. Over the last century we have seen many great chess players: Bobby Fischer, Emanuel Lasker, Boris Spassky, Samuel Reshevsky, and many others.

It’s incredible to be able to play a game that was created over 1000 years ago. Even after all this time chess is still one of the World’s favorite past times.

Now Streaming: Premier Chess Twitch LIVE

By Premier Chess CEO National Master Evan Rabin

Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura has single-handedly made chess a main-stream activity through his Twitch stream. While Twitch is primarily used by video gamers,  due to COVID-19 and cabin fever, many chess players have started streaming. Several months ago  our Jersey City School Programs manager National Expert Sean Finn  suggested I started streaming. While I thought it would be fun, I did not the see the value in doing it. However, when Former Hong Kong Chess Champion Andrew Koenigsberg   recently told me how many players were on it and how I could build a community. With some intiial guidance from him and some more design work from Liza Orlova, I was able to launch Premier Chess stream.

Thanks to our stream, we have made friends with fellow streamers and fans all around the world. So far, we got two children, including “Ladnayana“, to attend our virtual camp through Twitch.  We would like to thank all the streamers, including FM Anna-Maja, GM Alex Lenderman, Fortuna Chess Coach and GM Benjamin Bok, who decided to become ambassadors for our camp.

Furthermore, I would like to thank these streamer friends who have joined an informal Twitch networking group and have helped one another boost our follower and viewer counts:

  1.  Andrew Koenigsberg, MadQuickChess
  2. Felix Lopez, Chesswithfelix
  3. Angel Lopez, CoachAngelNYC
  4. John Hendrick , ChessCoachJohn
  5. Todd Bryant, StrongChess
  6. William Aramil, DynamicChessInc
  7. Dustin Hopkins, KingsideCoaching

    Follow our stream and send an email to evan@premierchess.com and you can arrange for yourself a complimentary 1-hour virtual private lesson. 

Behind the Game

By Shai Hecker, Operations Intern

Chess is one of the most popular games in the world. What’s so different about this game is that it is played in every country with the same rules. It’s similar to music as musical notes are the same in every language so is chess. All one needs is a board and the 32 pieces to play the game. No language is required to play the game allowing competitors from any country to play against each other. Chess is a game that brings people together.

Sports are generally associated with certain countries. What’s different about chess is that it is a universal game. Magnus Carlsen is the current Chess World Champion and he is from Norway. Another one of the top chess players in the world, Ding Liren, is from China. Ian Nepomniachtchi is a Russian chess player, while Levon Aronian is from Armenia. These are just a few of the top chess players in the world and they all come from different countries.

The game of chess was created in the 6th century so it seems that the game has spread all over the world. The game doesn’t belong to any country, and the game is not dominated by any country either. It’s a game of critical thinking and can be played by anyone from any background.

If you go to city squares you can find people playing chess on the street. The games brings people together from all sorts of backgrounds. Now as we remain indoors during Covid-19 many players have started playing chess online. You can now play against someone on the other side of the world. Chess is not just a fun game, as it also creates a community, as portrayed in CEO National Master Evan Rabin’s  US Chess travel tips article.

Chess in the Olympics?

By Shai Hecker, Operations Intern

The last time the Olympic Games were cancelled was in 1940. Japan was going to be the first non-Western country to host the Olympics. However, after Japan declared war on China the games were cancelled.

It has been 80 years since then and the Olympic games have once again been canceled due to the virus. Although the games are not completely cancelled, they will be postponed to a later date.

After the Olympics in Tokyo, the next Summer Olympics is to be held in Paris, France in 2024. A few new sports were proposed to be added to the Olympic Games, one of them being chess.

Recently a campaign was launched to include chess in the Paris Olympic Games in 2024. Due to the campaign FIDE has decided to advocate for chess by nominating it for the Olympic Games. The sports director for the Olympic Games in Paris had criteria for chess to be allowed as a sport. That Chess has a tradition in France and that the game must speak to the youth of France.

However, this is not the first time FIDE has advocated for chess to be a part of the Olympics. Unfortunately chess is not recognized universally as a sport as it does not involve any actual athleticism.

Hopefully with this new criteria proposed by the French Sports Director for the Olympic Games Chess will become a part of the Summer Olympics.

Can you do your job in Space?

By Shai Hecker, Operations Intern

Ariel Piekes, an IP attorney, wanted to enlighten his colleagues on how passionate they were about their profession. He asked them “can you do your job in space?” While this is meant to be rhetorical it is thought provoking. National Master Evan Rabin, the CEO of Premier Chess immediately knew his answer was “yes.” Doing your job in space is no menial task. Being separate from the rest of the world is an arduous task, but it can be done. Someone who is so devoted to their work and passionate about what they do would be able to accomplish such a task.

Chess would be a difficult board game to play in space. With a low amount of gravity the pieces may have trouble staying in place so a magnetic chess board might be ideal. Although this question is not meant to be taken literally  last week two Russian astronauts aboard a space station played against a chess grandmaster who was on Earth. The astronauts had an electric chess board with them and they played against Sergey Karjakin. They did this in celebration of the first Space-Earth chess game played 50 years prior.

The astronauts managed to end the game in a draw against the grandmaster showing that one can function well while in space. While this story strays from the point it does show the reality of chess in space.

The question also proposes how far one would go to continue their passion. Imagine your profession was no longer able to be performed from Earth, but could only be done in space. Could you envision yourself going onto a space station for months to continue your dream? This would require sacrifices, but most of us sacrifice so we can continue our passion.

To really see how passionate you are about your profession ask yourself this question: Can you do your job in space? This may illuminate for yourself how passionate you are about what you do.

Rating Points On And Off The Board

Let’s say that there is someone who’d be rated around 2000, and who’d want to improve at chess and so to feel a certain increase, in any way, shape or form, in his or her own chess rating. It’s probably normal to feel as somebody whose rating is probably not quite right, or high enough. Like we might have already witnessed a chess player saying that “ratings don’t matter” or that chess blitz is just “more fun”,and not that both statements aren’t just merely emotional and perhaps associated to the fact that usually, the “chess player in question” is just a mere expert, but perhaps that the reason why 2300+ rated players are more likely to consistently outplay 2000+ rated ones are primary associated to the amount of time one’s been putting into learning about his/her game. So let’s say that for someone who would feel like ratings are justifiably used and even more importantly, somewhat representative to his or her understanding of the game, then there might be a specific “chess routine” to develop around our daily habits to be able to better ourselves, through Chess.

  • Puzzles matter

I’m not a great fan at looking at a diagram for hours and going over lines that might never actually occur, but that’s not the main source of my reasoning that leads me into believing that doing puzzle isn’t really the thing that’s going to impact my rating, in any meaningful way at all. As a 2000 player, I try not to rely too much on them but they still come in handy to convert a dominating middle game position into an actual winning endgame.

  • What is winning and what is not?

Based on my rating I might think that I might outplay a, let’s say 2100+ player, right? I mean as far as being 100″ USCF ratings points over my USCF ELO” I could still end up with the more “convenient middle game”.

Well,I believe that whether or not you can memorize plenty of chess openings, chess endgames or just generally chess patterns, tactics show on and off, and it’s not too much about how many diagrams you can shove into your brain cells, but it also comes down to what kind of “chess routine” one follows.

  • But “What Is Chess Routine”?

Well (FM) Mike Klein pretty much said that it’s really not so much about what you know or what you enjoy doing, it’s also what goes on around you and what makes you into what you’ve become. The DOE might allow a certain amount of money, that might benefits one’s learning access into becoming a proficient chess player or not, but as far as being apart of a chess club, or  a school district’s project, you don’t have to just rely on the city’s initiative to naturally hand out money every now and then.

In our case we might once in a while, try out a certain Gambit and beat a 300- lower rated opponent in a certain opening we don’t know so much about, but that doesn’t mean that one truly master it.

That’s why we’re trying to level out the different kind of access one might get as far as being able to learn about chess, rather that just deliberating whether or not one could just get. So there is nothing wrong with practicing puzzles every now and then just to kind of hope to improve on how much we could get done during an actual “OTB” game.